GDG- Gettysburg Movie Question

Andy Mills amills at jplcreative.com
Mon Jan 30 08:38:43 CST 2012


JD:

Appreciate the information and thank you for taking the time to answer it.  

Thanks,

-----Original Message-----
From: gettysburg-bounces at arthes.com [mailto:gettysburg-bounces at arthes.com] On Behalf Of J David Petruzzi
Sent: Monday, January 30, 2012 9:35 AM
To: GDG
Subject: Re: GDG- Gettysburg Movie Question

Esteemed GDG Member Contributes:

> 
> My wife and I found ourselves in Gettysburg this weekend and at one point, stopped at the Farnsworth House for a bite to eat. They have a TV over the bar that seems to be constantly playing either Gettysburg or Gods & Generals. My wife was watching the scene where Freemantle was walking around with Longstreet just prior to the attack on July 2nd and quoting "different dreams, different dreams" (and also how the names of both armies are British in origin).
> 
> During this scene, they show Freemantle walking around with Longstreet, but the entire time, he had a cup and saucer and drinking tea. My wife made a reference to that and I responded that "I didn't think anyone would have a cup and saucer and be walking around with it during a battle, let alone worry about keeping it during the march." She didn't fully agree with me and thought an advisor, especially a British one, would make a point to carry it with him and it really wouldn't take up much space for travel. I have to admit that my response to her was only "my opinion (and told her as such, that I couldn't say with any certainty)".
> 
> So my question is: did Freemantle actually walk around with a cup / saucer, or is this Hollywood making a stereotype of the British?
> 
> Thanks,

 
Andy,
He very well could have.  There are lots of accounts of officers on both sides who packed fine china, linen, silverware, etc. to be used even while on active campaign.  It seems to have been pretty common during the CW.  And during the Mexican War, Winfield Scott always had his fine silverware, china and glassware handy to be used in his tent each evening for dinner.  So I would have no doubt that a proper British officer would have the fine china along for "tea time."
 
J.D. 		 	   		  
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