GDG- Lost Cause and Inevitibility

CWMHTours at aol.com CWMHTours at aol.com
Sun Jan 22 17:57:33 CST 2012


Keith-
 
I am not uncomfortable at all with the idea of somebody  kissing somebody 
else with consent. 
 
But the idea of the "sloppy" thing makes me slightly  queasy.   I've always 
had a bad stomach.
 
Have you considered that a nice "tidy" kiss might be more  appropriate?
 
"Just  the facts, ma'am." 

Your Most Obediant Servant
Peter  

 
In a message dated 1/22/2012 6:52:58 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
bluzdad at yahoo.com writes:

Esteemed  GDG Member Contributes:
Margret:
answer:  "There were major  agricultural areas, including the granary of 
the Midwest which was an  important factor in keeping the UK neutral since it 
needed the importation of  those foodstuffs as much if not more than it did 
cotton."
An example of the  answer to a question it never would have occurred to me 
to  ask.
(question: "What did the Union export that rivaled the  Confederacys cotton 
exports.")
you do this to me all the time Margaret.  
There's a big sloppy kiss coming your way at the  muster.
K



"Hello! I'm The Doctor."
(Dr.  Who)


________________________________
From: Margaret D. Blough  <mdblough1 at comcast.net>
To: GDG <gettysburg at arthes.com>  
Sent: Sunday, January 22, 2012 6:06 PM
Subject: Re: GDG- Lost Cause and  Inevitibility

Esteemed GDG Member Contributes:
The North did  not have unlimited supplies. No one does. The degree of 
industrialization in  the free states is often exaggerated by Lost Causers. 
There were major  agricultural areas, including the granary of the Midwest which 
was an  important factor in keeping the UK neutral since it needed the 
importation of  those foodstuffs as much if not more than it did cotton. 


No one  forced the slave states to turn themselves into quasi-colonies, 
producing  staple crops in return for finished goods. It also chose not to 
emphasize  industrialization, although there were some important exceptions such 
as the  Tredegar Iron Works. 


Much of the difference between the loyal  states and the rebel was that the 
Union used its resources more efficiently  and effectively than the rebel 
states did. 


Regards,  


Margaret 

----- Original Message -----
From: "William  Richardson" <general.jackson at yahoo.com> 
To: "GDG"  <gettysburg at arthes.com> 
Sent: Sunday, January 22, 2012 5:58:32 PM  
Subject: Re: GDG- Lost Cause and Inevitibility 

Esteemed GDG Member  Contributes: 
Then Lee and Jeff Davis were guilty of criminal misconduct  for fighting a 
war they had no chance to win? 

Best Regards, 
Al  Mackey  

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----  

Al, 

If that is what you so choose to believe. I do not see  them anymore guilty 
than George Washington in the Revolutionary War. 
Plus  one never knows what will happen... 

Lincoln is hit at the 40 yard line  and spun around, ohh the ball is
loose..it's picked up by Lee and  Davis..There at the 30...the 20...the 
10... 
...TOUCHDOWN...The Rebels  win............. 


It is a FACT the North had UNLIMITED man power.  It is a FACT the North had 
UNLIMITED supplies. Unless of course you are of the  belief that McClellan 
and the South out-numbered the North..............  
Respectfully, 

William Richardson 
Mount Gilead, North Carolina  

" The direct cause of the outbreak of the War Between The States was  
slavery; the direct object of the prosecution of the war was the preservation  of 
the Union. "  
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