GDG- O'Relly book filming for History channel

CWMHTours at aol.com CWMHTours at aol.com
Fri Jan 13 19:01:01 CST 2012


I think that if you are going to set yourself up as a  professional 
historian or historical writer then you ought to meet the standards  you set.   
Shouldn't be making a lot of goofy errors, inserting your  view of what a 
character is thinking or making up a conversation when there  is no historical 
conformation of it.
 
You either are a historian writing historian or you are  not.  It's black 
and white to me.
 
Hot on the trail of Swanson's [criticism deleted here] book  "Manhunt" of 
which a lot of historians are very critical here comes another  sloppy 
attempt, and issued just when the movie "The Conspirator" came  out.
 
Been to see Mark Leepson a couple of times who wrote  "Monocacy: The Battle 
That Saved Washington"   (Really?).   Appeared to swap terms like brigade 
and battalion interchangably and regiments  and divisions.  Didn't seem to 
really know his characters and their  history.  Much of his talks were of the 
Old Wives Tales type.  I never  bought his book.
 
When Ginrich came out with his Gtybg book years ago I saw  him.  At the end 
I was quite unimpressed.  Seemed also not to  know his characters.  He made 
this historical proposition but when myself  and others would try to pin 
down how, when, where, etc Longstreet would pull off  the big move he seemed 
to be very vague.  I could have bought an  autographed book.   I didn't.
 
Swanson constantly inserts thoughts and conversation that only  came out of 
his own imagination.  Lots of historians besides myself are  pretty 
critical of his work.  I read the book, twice, but because it was a  gift. 
 
It's either History or it is not.
 
Your  Most Obedient Servant,
Peter  

 
In a message dated 1/13/2012 7:18:58 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
jlb4tlb at yahoo.com writes:

Esteemed  GDG Member Contributes:
Why not?  Is there some magicial event that  has to take place to 
qualifties or not a person from writing as they  please.  its entirely up to the 
consomer to make the desicion if the work  merits money.  

BTW, Ginrich writes fiction that is based on  the Civil War, so  yes yiu 
are wrong.

O'Reilly phony?   personal insult or do you have facts?

Namaste

Jeff  Burk


>________________________________
> From:  "CWMHTours at aol.com" <CWMHTours at aol.com>
>To: gettysburg at arthes.com  
>Sent: Friday, January 13, 2012 6:33 PM
>Subject: Re: GDG-  O'Relly book filming for History channel
>  
>Esteemed GDG  Member Contributes:
>SAee?  Everything about O'Reilly's book is  true.   Quasi- or phony 
>historians such as O'Reilly and  Gingrich should not be writing  about the 
Civil War.  
>
>Your  Most Obedient Servant,
>Peter   
>
>
>In a message dated 1/13/2012 3:55:43 P.M. Eastern  Standard Time,  
>TerryBrasko at mindspring.com  writes:
>
>Esteemed  GDG Member  Contributes:
>>  "Killing Lincoln" was an outstanding  read  as I was unaware of the 
entire
>story, like most folks I knew the   general outline of what happened. Now I
>have a much better  understanding of  the facts.
>
>>Lets hope this turns out  better  then the Gettysburg program The   Scotts
>did.
>
>>Namaste
>
>>Jeff  Burk
>
>
>Let's hope  they leave out the errors.   Here is the National Park   
Service
>Review:
>
>
>
>Here is the full  National Park Service  review:
>
>Ford’s Theatre National  Historic Site
>
>Review of Killing  Lincoln, Bill O’Reilly  and Martin Dugard
>
>Reviewer for Ford’s Theatre  National  Historic Site, Rae Emerson,  Deputy
>Superintendent
>
>Eastern  National –  Cooperating Association
>
>History
>
>Eastern  National,  formerly known as Eastern National Park and  Monument
>Association, is a  501(C) (3) not-for-profit “cooperating  association,” 
>that
>supports the  National Park Service.  Cooperating associations are 
recognized
>by Congress  as a means to  assist the educational and interpretive 
mission 
>of
>the   National Park Service. Cooperating associations provide  various
>services,  primarily by procuring, distributing and  selling educational
>material in  retail outlets located in  national parks . . . .
>
>Products
>
>The   products sold at Eastern National bookstores are a combination  of
>Eastern  National-produced items and merchandise purchased  through outside
>vendors,  including books, reproductions, apparel,  and collectibles. All
>products  sold in Eastern National retail  outlets are evaluated by 
National
>Park  Service interpreters for  historical accuracy, quality, and 
relevance  
>to
>park  themes. Strict standards are maintained to ensure we offer the   
finest
>quality products that will enhance visitors’ experiences. As  a  
cooperating
>association, Eastern National sells only products  that the  National Park
>Service has  approved.
>
>Reference: Eastern   National
>
>Product Selection Criteria – Ford’s Theatre National  Historic  Site
>
>Relevance to park’s  themes
>Historically accurate
>Publication  has relevant  citations
>Reflects scholarship; the use of primary resources  with  documentation
>Factual errors in publication
>
>The  following  errors are noted in chapters the reviewer was well versed  
in
>the subject  matter. Other chapters may also have similar  findings noted 
by
>subject  matter experts or other reviewers.  These observations are  not
>included.
>
>Errors are  identified by chapter, followed by passage  where error is  
noted,
>then followed by a fact comment, which is followed by  the  reference for 
the
>fact  comment.
>
>Prologue
>
>“He furls his  brow . . .  .” furl – nautical term to compact, roll up;
>furrows – narrow   grove, depression on any surface, i.e., furrows of a
>wrinkled   face
>
>Chapter 15
>
>“The two warriors will never  meet  again.”
>
>Fact comment:
>
>On April 10,  1865 Generals Lee and Grant  met a second time at Appomattox
>Court  House, Virginia. At that second  meeting General Lee requested that 
 
>his
>men be given evidence that they were  paroled  prisoners – to protect them
>from arrest or harassment. 28,231   parole passes were issued to  
>Confederates.
>
>Reference:
>
>Appomattox   Court House National Historical Park
>
>Chapter  19
>
>“After it  (Ford’s Theatre) was burned to the ground in  1863 . . . . . . 
. 
>>
>Fact   comment:
>
>December 30, 1862, fire broke out and gutted the  interior  leaving only 
the
>blackened walls   standing.
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of Ford’s  Theatre (Historic  Structures Report, George J.
>Olszewski, Ph.D,  Historian, National Capital  Region, National Park 
Service;
>1963;  p. 11)
>
>Chapter 21, 27,  etc.
>
>“Grant meets  with Lincoln in the Oval Office.”
>
>“Lincoln  sitting in his  Oval Office . . .”
>
>Fact comment:
>
>Oval  Office  built in 1909 during Taft’s  administration.
>
>Chapter 30
>
>“On the  nights  when the Lincolns are in attendance  . . . . . . . . . 
and   
>a
>portrait of George Washington faces out at the audience,  designating  that
>the president of the United States is in the  house.”
>
>Fact  comment:
>
>Messenger arrived at  the theatre from the White House about  10:30 a.m.
>(April 14,  1865) to reserve the presidential box for the  performance  
that
>evening.
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of  Ford’s  Theatre (Historic Structures Report, George J.
>Olszewski,  Ph.D, Historian,  National Capital Region, National Park  
Service;
>1963; p. 53)
>
>“Ford  added an additional  touch to these normal decorations of the
>presidential  box when he  placed a gilt-framed engraving of Washington its
>central pillar   for the first time.”
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of  Ford’s Theatre  (Historic Structures Report, George J.
>Olszewski,  Ph.D, Historian, National  Capital Region, National Park  
Service;
>1963; p. 54)
>
>“So Ford’s Opera  House, as  the theater is formally known, is his (Booth)
>permanent   address.”
>
>Fact comment:
>
>During the period from  December 1861 –  February 1862, Ford rented the
>theatre to George  Christy, who advertised  the building as “The George
>Christy Opera  House”.
>
>After renovating  the theatre in February 1862,  the theatre reopened in 
>March
>1862 under  Ford’s name:  Ford’s Atheneum.
>
>In February 1863 work started to rebuild   the theatre after the December 
30,
>1862 fire. The theatre known as  “Ford’s  New Theatre” reopened on 
Thursday,
>August 27, 1863 and  later referred to as  Ford’s  Theatre.
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of Ford’s  Theatre  (Historic Structures Report, George J.
>Olszewski, Ph.D,  Historian, National  Capital Region, National Park 
Service;
>1963;  pages 7– 13)
>
>“The state  box, where the Lincolns and  Grants will site this evening, is
>almost on the  stage itself . .  . . . . . . . . distance traveled would 
be a
>mere nine   feet.”
>
>Fact Comment:
>
>The presidential party  occupied two boxes,  # 7 and #8 which, when 
combined,
>are referred  to as the presidential box;  the state boxes are build on  
the
>stage proper; the distance from the state  box to the stage is  11 and ½ 
feet
>to 12 feet depending on what end the box  is  measured. This difference is
>based on the rake or slant of the  stage  towards the  audience.
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of Ford’s  Theatre  (Historic Structures Report, George J.
>Olszewski, Ph.D,  Historian, National  Capital Region, National Park 
Service;
>1963;  pp. 46, 51, 55)
>
>“Booth  has performed here often and is  more familiar with its hidden
>backstage  tunnels . . . .  .”
>
>Comment:
>
>Booth played twelve  performances  from November 3 – 14, 1863. He will not
>perform  again at Ford’s Theatre  until March 18, 1865.
>
>“In the  southeast corner (of the stage) was a  two-foot wide stairway  
along
>the south wall which led to the basement. This  stairway  also provided 
>access
>to the orchestra pit and unhindered   passageway from stage-right to
>stage-left through the basement and by  the  stairs along the north wall, 
to
>the small exit door at the  rear alley. The  passageway on stage-right 
varied
>in width  according to the manner in which  the scenery was piled along  
the
>north wall to the rear door. Generally this  passageway was  kept clear to
>provide for an orderly movement of stage  scenery  and for the unencumbered
>entrance and exit of actors awaiting  their  cues in the adjoining 
greenroom
>in the north wing.   “
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of Ford’s Theatre  (Historic Structures  Report, George J.
>Olszewski, Ph.D,  Historian, National Capital Region,  National Park 
Service;
>1963;  pp. 36, 47)
>
>“The show (Our American  Cousin) has been  presented eight pervious time at
>Ford’s . . . . . .   .
>
>Face comment:
>
>Our American Cousin was  performed seven times  prior to April 14, 1865: 
Jan
>11 and 12,  1864; Mar 11 and 12 1864; Aug 4,  1864; Aug 6, 1864; Feb 25,  
1865
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of Ford’s   Theatre (Historic Structures Report, George J.
>Olszewski, Ph.D,  Historian,  National Capital Region, National Park 
Service;
>1963;  pp. 111  -121)
>
>Chapter 39
>
>“Booth’s second  act of preparation that  afternoon was using a pen knife 
to
>carve  a very small peephole in the back  wall of the state box. Now he  
looks
>through the hole to get a better view  of the  president.”
>
>Fact comment:
>
>“Despite all attempts  to prove,  without success, that the hole in the 
door
>to box 7 was  bored by Booth that  same afternoon, a recent letter from  
Frank
>Ford of New York City (to  Olszewski, April 13, 1962) may  clarify the 
fact.
>In part, his letter  states:
>
>As I  told you on your visit here in New York, I say again and   
unequivocally
>that John Wilkes Booth did not bore the hole in the  door  leading to the 
box
>President Lincoln occupied the night of  the  assassination, April 14, 
1865  
>.
>.  .
>
>The hole was bored by my  father, Harry Clay Ford, or  rather on his 
orders,
>and was bored for the  very simple reason it  would allow the guard, on
>Parker, easy opportunity  whenever he so  desired to look into the box 
rather
>than to open the inner  door  to check on the presidential party . .   ..
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of Ford’s Theatre   (Historic Structures&  Report, George J.
>Olszewski, Ph.D,  Historian, National Capital Region,  National Park 
Service;
>1963;  pp.55 -56)
>
>
>
>Final   disposition:
>
>Publication (Killing Lincoln) not recommended as a  sales  item in the 
>Eastern
>National Bookstore located in  the Museum at Ford’s  Theatre National 
>Historic
>because of  the lack of documentation and the  factual errors within  the
>publication.
>
>Terry   Brasko
>
>
>
>
>
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