GDG- O'Relly book filming for History channel

Jeff Burk jlb4tlb at yahoo.com
Fri Jan 13 15:07:28 CST 2012


That is not the NPS review.  That was a hachett job by a liberl park ranger that hates O"Reilly.  Mr. O'Reilly has requested the ranger to appear on  his show and go over the allegded errors.  Said ranger declined.


 Namaste
 
Jeff Burk


>________________________________
> From: Terry Brasko <TerryBrasko at mindspring.com>
>To: 'GDG' <gettysburg at arthes.com> 
>Sent: Friday, January 13, 2012 3:55 PM
>Subject: Re: GDG- O'Relly book filming for History channel
>  
>Esteemed GDG Member Contributes:
>>  "Killing Lincoln" was an outstanding read as I was unaware of the entire
>story, like most folks I knew the general outline of what happened. Now I
>have a much better understanding of the facts.
>  
>    >Lets hope this turns out better then the Gettysburg program The Scotts
>did.
>
>>Namaste
>
>>Jeff Burk
>
>
>Let's hope they leave out the errors.  Here is the National Park Service
>Review:
>
>
>
>Here is the full National Park Service review:
>
>Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site
>
>Review of Killing Lincoln, Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard
>
>Reviewer for Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site, Rae Emerson, Deputy
>Superintendent
>
>Eastern National – Cooperating Association
>
>History
>
>Eastern National, formerly known as Eastern National Park and Monument
>Association, is a 501(C) (3) not-for-profit “cooperating association,” that
>supports the National Park Service. Cooperating associations are recognized
>by Congress as a means to assist the educational and interpretive mission of
>the National Park Service. Cooperating associations provide various
>services, primarily by procuring, distributing and selling educational
>material in retail outlets located in national parks . . . .
>
>Products
>
>The products sold at Eastern National bookstores are a combination of
>Eastern National-produced items and merchandise purchased through outside
>vendors, including books, reproductions, apparel, and collectibles. All
>products sold in Eastern National retail outlets are evaluated by National
>Park Service interpreters for historical accuracy, quality, and relevance to
>park themes. Strict standards are maintained to ensure we offer the finest
>quality products that will enhance visitors’ experiences. As a cooperating
>association, Eastern National sells only products that the National Park
>Service has approved.
>
>Reference: Eastern National
>
>Product Selection Criteria – Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site
>
>Relevance to park’s themes
>Historically accurate
>Publication has relevant citations
>Reflects scholarship; the use of primary resources with documentation
>Factual errors in publication
>
>The following errors are noted in chapters the reviewer was well versed in
>the subject matter. Other chapters may also have similar findings noted by
>subject matter experts or other reviewers. These observations are not
>included.
>
>Errors are identified by chapter, followed by passage where error is noted,
>then followed by a fact comment, which is followed by the reference for the
>fact comment.
>
>Prologue
>
>“He furls his brow . . . .” furl – nautical term to compact, roll up;
>furrows – narrow grove, depression on any surface, i.e., furrows of a
>wrinkled face
>
>Chapter 15
>
>“The two warriors will never meet again.”
>
>Fact comment:
>
>On April 10, 1865 Generals Lee and Grant met a second time at Appomattox
>Court House, Virginia. At that second meeting General Lee requested that his
>men be given evidence that they were paroled prisoners – to protect them
>from arrest or harassment. 28,231 parole passes were issued to Confederates.
>
>Reference:
>
>Appomattox Court House National Historical Park
>
>Chapter 19
>
>“After it (Ford’s Theatre) was burned to the ground in 1863 . . . . . . . “
>
>Fact comment:
>
>December 30, 1862, fire broke out and gutted the interior leaving only the
>blackened walls standing.
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of Ford’s Theatre (Historic Structures Report, George J.
>Olszewski, Ph.D, Historian, National Capital Region, National Park Service;
>1963; p. 11)
>
>Chapter 21, 27, etc.
>
>“Grant meets with Lincoln in the Oval Office.”
>
>“Lincoln sitting in his Oval Office . . .”
>
>Fact comment:
>
>Oval Office built in 1909 during Taft’s administration.
>
>Chapter 30
>
>“On the nights when the Lincolns are in attendance  . . . . . . . . . and a
>portrait of George Washington faces out at the audience, designating that
>the president of the United States is in the house.”
>
>Fact comment:
>
>Messenger arrived at the theatre from the White House about 10:30 a.m.
>(April 14, 1865) to reserve the presidential box for the performance that
>evening.
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of Ford’s Theatre (Historic Structures Report, George J.
>Olszewski, Ph.D, Historian, National Capital Region, National Park Service;
>1963; p. 53)
>
>“Ford added an additional touch to these normal decorations of the
>presidential box when he placed a gilt-framed engraving of Washington its
>central pillar for the first time.”
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of Ford’s Theatre (Historic Structures Report, George J.
>Olszewski, Ph.D, Historian, National Capital Region, National Park Service;
>1963; p. 54)
>
>“So Ford’s Opera House, as the theater is formally known, is his (Booth)
>permanent address.”
>
>Fact comment:
>
>During the period from December 1861 – February 1862, Ford rented the
>theatre to George Christy, who advertised the building as “The George
>Christy Opera House”.
>
>After renovating the theatre in February 1862, the theatre reopened in March
>1862 under Ford’s name: Ford’s Atheneum.
>
>In February 1863 work started to rebuild the theatre after the December 30,
>1862 fire. The theatre known as “Ford’s New Theatre” reopened on Thursday,
>August 27, 1863 and later referred to as Ford’s Theatre.
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of Ford’s Theatre (Historic Structures Report, George J.
>Olszewski, Ph.D, Historian, National Capital Region, National Park Service;
>1963; pages 7– 13)
>
>“The state box, where the Lincolns and Grants will site this evening, is
>almost on the stage itself . . . . . . . . . . distance traveled would be a
>mere nine feet.”
>
>Fact Comment:
>
>The presidential party occupied two boxes, # 7 and #8 which, when combined,
>are referred to as the presidential box; the state boxes are build on the
>stage proper; the distance from the state box to the stage is 11 and ½ feet
>to 12 feet depending on what end the box is measured. This difference is
>based on the rake or slant of the stage towards the audience.
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of Ford’s Theatre (Historic Structures Report, George J.
>Olszewski, Ph.D, Historian, National Capital Region, National Park Service;
>1963; pp. 46, 51, 55)
>
>“Booth has performed here often and is more familiar with its hidden
>backstage tunnels . . . . .”
>
>Comment:
>
>Booth played twelve performances from November 3 – 14, 1863. He will not
>perform again at Ford’s Theatre until March 18, 1865.
>
>“In the southeast corner (of the stage) was a two-foot wide stairway along
>the south wall which led to the basement. This stairway also provided access
>to the orchestra pit and unhindered passageway from stage-right to
>stage-left through the basement and by the stairs along the north wall, to
>the small exit door at the rear alley. The passageway on stage-right varied
>in width according to the manner in which the scenery was piled along the
>north wall to the rear door. Generally this passageway was kept clear to
>provide for an orderly movement of stage scenery and for the unencumbered
>entrance and exit of actors awaiting their cues in the adjoining greenroom
>in the north wing. “
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of Ford’s Theatre (Historic Structures Report, George J.
>Olszewski, Ph.D, Historian, National Capital Region, National Park Service;
>1963; pp. 36, 47)
>
>“The show (Our American Cousin) has been presented eight pervious time at
>Ford’s . . . . . . .
>
>Face comment:
>
>Our American Cousin was performed seven times prior to April 14, 1865: Jan
>11 and 12, 1864; Mar 11 and 12 1864; Aug 4, 1864; Aug 6, 1864; Feb 25, 1865
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of Ford’s Theatre (Historic Structures Report, George J.
>Olszewski, Ph.D, Historian, National Capital Region, National Park Service;
>1963; pp. 111 -121)
>
>Chapter 39
>
>“Booth’s second act of preparation that afternoon was using a pen knife to
>carve a very small peephole in the back wall of the state box. Now he looks
>through the hole to get a better view of the president.”
>
>Fact comment:
>
>“Despite all attempts to prove, without success, that the hole in the door
>to box 7 was bored by Booth that same afternoon, a recent letter from Frank
>Ford of New York City (to Olszewski, April 13, 1962) may clarify the fact.
>In part, his letter states:
>
>As I told you on your visit here in New York, I say again and unequivocally
>that John Wilkes Booth did not bore the hole in the door leading to the box
>President Lincoln occupied the night of the assassination, April 14, 1865  .
>. .
>
>The hole was bored by my father, Harry Clay Ford, or rather on his orders,
>and was bored for the very simple reason it would allow the guard, on
>Parker, easy opportunity whenever he so desired to look into the box rather
>than to open the inner door to check on the presidential party . . ..
>
>Reference:
>
>Restoration of Ford’s Theatre (Historic Structures Report, George J.
>Olszewski, Ph.D, Historian, National Capital Region, National Park Service;
>1963; pp.55 -56)
>
>
>
>Final disposition:
>
>Publication (Killing Lincoln) not recommended as a sales item in the Eastern
>National Bookstore located in the Museum at Ford’s Theatre National Historic
>because of the lack of documentation and the factual errors within the
>publication.
>
>Terry Brasko
>
> 
>  
>
>
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