GDG- Changes to the battlefield in the late 19th Century

John Lawrence jlawrence at kc.rr.com
Wed Jan 11 17:57:17 CST 2012


I remember it very well.
Do you have an electronic map?
Regards,
Jack

Eileen Murphy <manassas1 at comcast.net> wrote:

>Esteemed GDG Member Contributes:
>
>
>Nancy...... 
>
>
>
>I did quite a bit of research on the trolley/railroads leading to and thru the park several years ago and even gave a tour or two about them for the GDG.  There are still some railroad mile markers on the field today as well as the remnants of the rails themselves.  Great stuff. 
>
>
>
>Eileen Murphy 
>
>Bristow, vA 
>
>
>
>----- Original Message -----
>
>
>From: "Nancy Householder" <pipecreek1430 at yahoo.com> 
>To: "Gettysburg Discussion" <gettysburg at arthes.com> 
>Sent: Wednesday, January 11, 2012 3:53:47 PM 
>Subject: GDG- Changes to the battlefield in the late 19th Century 
>
>Esteemed GDG Member Contributes: 
>After my questions about Tipton Park, thanks to JD, he recomended I get the book," Devils Den 
>a History and Guide." Of course I went out an bought that book the next day. 
>
>The following is some information I learned about from that book, about 
>changes to that area in the 1880's and 1890's. 
>    " In the spring of 1884, the Gettysburg and Harrisburg Railroad completed construction of a line 
>that linked Gettysburg with the state capitol. Shortly after ward it developed an excursion line that 
>ran across the battlefield. This line passed over the fields of Picketts charge crossed GBMA holdings 
>near the present location of the Father Corby monument and ran through the woods to a station 
>that was established on the east side of LRT. Construction on the Round Top branch began on 
>April 24, 1884, and was completed  in early June of that year. 
>
>Dynamite accomplished wonders in splitting and moving granite, in one instance, throwing a rock 
>estimated at 9 tons, several hundred feet. 
>
>At the terminus of the tracks, 13 acres of land were purchased from Lewis A Bushman and 
>
>developed into a park to provide a destination to visitors over this new route. Improvements to 
>this tract included a spacious pavilion, a kitchen with range, two wells of water with pumps 
>and all necessary buildings. When it opened, "Round Top Park " became an overnight success. 
>
>On July 4, 1884 Col. John H McClellan held an "ox roast" at the new park to celebrate it's opening. 
>Admission was free and the Colonel provided a massive beef weighing over 1300 pounds. It was 
>
>estimated that between 5 and 6,000 people attended. 
>
>It became very popular and there were problems with the huge amount of people at the park. 
>The Gettysburg & Harrisburg Railroad  Company even tried to get permission for the GBMA 
> to construct a path to the top of LRT where, it was announced, an observatory 60 ft high 
>
>would be erected for the benefit of the excursionists, since the one on Big Round Top was to 
>difficult to reach. 
>
>An 1885 advertisement gave the following description of the park. 
>
>    To make the Gettysburg and Harrisburg Railroad more complete, a spur has been 
>built from Gettysburg to Round Top, three miles, int he same careful and splendid manor 
>of the main line. Indeed, the construction of the Gettysburg and Harrisburg Railroad is 
>of the highest standard and justifies the great credit given to the best railroad work. 
>The spur road ends on the side of Little Round Top itself, within a good stone's throw 
>
>of the summit made so  famous by the patriot blood of Vincent and his brothers-in-arms. 
>The track ends in a choicely laid out park. Here have been gathered with lavish hand 
>
>every comfort and convenience that can make happy the life of the picnicker or 
>excursionist. Dining-rooms, a dancing pavilion, rooms for rest and recreation, shady 
>seats and lounging places under the great trees, kitchens, baggage rooms, places for 
>
>your bundles and baskets, spring water in abundance, the choicest of breezes, the 
>perfume of a carpet of wild flowers, and a natural awning of leaves to check the 
>suns rays, should they become too ardent, are the fittings of this Paradise. 
>
>
>Don't you love it!  Nancy Householder 
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